The Branch Line Society

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The Weymouth Walkabout - 23rd March 2019

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The only inaccessible part of the whole route is the first few hundred yards from Weymouth Jn to the B3155 level crossing.<br>[&copy; Neil Greenwood, 2019]

No 2 in the sequence along the branch from the junction to Quay<br>[&copy; Neil Greenwood, 2019]

No 3 in the sequence along the branch from the junction to Quay<br>[&copy; Neil Greenwood, 2019]

No 4 in the sequence along the branch from the junction to Quay<br>[&copy; Neil Greenwood, 2019]

No 5 in the sequence along the branch from the junction to Quay<br>[&copy; Neil Greenwood, 2019]

No 6 in the sequence along the branch from the junction to Quay<br>[&copy; Neil Greenwood, 2019]

A reminder of just how big and daunting a train is at ground level. (August 1977)<br>[&copy; Ian Mortimer 1977]

Approaching Quay station, looking back towards the town the remains of the cargo stage at Custom House Quay can be seen. A loop, where the cars are parked, once enabled the transfer of goods between rail and ship.<br>[&copy; Neil Greenwood, 2019]

The same location with that loop, disused but in situ, August 1977 and The Channel Island Boat train passing. Note the complex pointwork bottom left<br>[&copy; Ian Mortimer 1977]

The tramway formerly split into three tracks at the station, looking back towards the junction.<br>[&copy; Neil Greenwood, 2019]

Looking in the other direction, the remaining platform; ferries used to load on the right.<br>[&copy; Neil Greenwood, 2019]

Weymouth Quay station is now very run down<br>[&copy; Neil Greenwood, 2019]

August 1977 again, the Channel Island Boat train was an impressive length; 10-12 coaches. Four years earlier on a 2-week All Line Rover (£32) your BLN Editor realised, for the first time, at Weymouth Quay that it was important to be at the 'right' end of such a long train.<br>[&copy; Ian Mortimer 1977]